Press Room | Cherokee, NC

How will Cherokee affect you?

Cherokee’s 41st Annual Powwow caps July 4th weekend

CHEROKEE, N.C. – The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ 41st Annual Powwow kicks off July 1 and runs through July 3 at the Cherokee Acquoni Expo Center.

The Powwow is a yearly three-day explosion of authentic Indian dancing, drumming and tribal regalia. The event features dance competitions offering more than $60,000 in cash prizes, plus hand drumming, tribal sports, tiny tots, fireworks, and special contests all weekend long.

Gates open Friday, July 1, at 5 p.m.; Saturday, July 2, and Sunday, July 3 at 12 p.m. Daily admission is $12, or $10 a day with a Food Lion Card (MVP). Tickets can be purchased at the gate.

For information, contact: Daniel Tramper, dtramper@gmail.com or 828-399- 0835, Frieda Huskey, friehusk@nc-cherokee.com or 828-359-6492; or Angela Hernandez, angehern@nc-cherokee.com or 828-359-6479.

Visitors can also contact the Cherokee Welcome Center: 800-438-1601 or by email at travel@nc-cherokee.com.

###

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. 


Cherokee’s Beloved Man: Jerry Wolfe

Cherokee, NC – Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians tribal elder Jerry Wolfe has served the people of the EBCI every day of his life. A fluent speaker and traditionalist, he is always willing to share his knowledge of the Cherokee culture. 

Due to his self-sacrifice and willingness to serve, Wolfe has been given the title of Beloved Man of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, a designation that hasn’t been given to a man since the early 1800s.

“I think our old ways are so important,” said Big Cove Rep. Bo Taylor, who originally submitted the resolution for the designation. “We talk about some really important issues. We talk about gaming. We talk about buying other land, but one thing that we need to remember is that the reason we sit here is because we are Indian people. We haven’t had this in a long time. It’s been many, many years since we’ve honored our elders in this way.” 

Rep. Taylor said he has known Wolfe all of his adult life. “He has been nothing but a good person and served this community. I know it’s never been done before in the modern era, but I hope that we would take the time to remember who we are, as Indian people, and this is what we do.”

Brief history of Beloved Man

Throughout the 1700s, whether the Cherokees were in treaty negotiations or at the colonial capitals of Charleston and Williamsburg, they spoke about the Beloved Men and the Beloved Women. These tribal members were warriors who were too old to go to war anymore, but who were valued for their service to the tribe.

In addition to living a life of service, they were also respected for their integrity and good character. The last recorded instance of a Beloved Man was Little Turkey, who died in 1801. 

###

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Cherokee storytellers rekindle ancient tales

CHEROKEE, N.C. - From May 27 through October 1, visitors to Cherokee can again spend evenings around a roaring bonfire with tribal storytellers who spin tales of days gone by. The bonfires are held 7–9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and every evening from June 27 through July 2. Admission is free and marshmallows for roasting are provided.

Clad in 17th-century period dress, storytellers recount myths and mysteries passed down through the ages as well as tell the history of the Cherokee people. Guests learn Cherokee survival skills and experience traditional native dance. The events are held at Oconaluftee Islands Park, adjacent to the Island Indian Art Market (across the road from the KFC on the corner of Tsali Boulevard and U.S. Route 441).                                    

For information: 1-800-438-1601 or travel@nc-cherokee.com, or contact Daniel Tramper at 828.99.0835.

###

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than

15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Summer kicks off with major Cherokee trout tourney

CHEROKEE, N.C. - This year, Cherokee’s Memorial Day Trout Tournament will take place May 27–29, offering a weekend of outdoor fun and $10,000 in prizes for tagged fish caught in tribal waters. The tournament is open to all ages and all legal fishing methods. The entry fee is $11.

Participants can register at the Cherokee Welcome Center, 498 Tsali Blvd., or anywhere fishing licenses are sold. Anglers can win cash prizes ranging from $20 to $500 based on the color of the tag.

The Qualla Boundary boasts 30 miles of freestone streams, and only 2.2 miles of catch-and-release waters are excluded from the Memorial Day event.

Prize redemption for tagged fish will be at the Water Beetle Stage next to the Cherokee Welcome Center. Register to redeem cash prizes anywhere fishing licenses are sold. Nearly 250,000 rainbow, brown and brook trout are released annually into Cherokee waters, which are stocked twice each week and include many trophy sizes. The river system comprises the longest privately owned and stocked waters east of the Mississippi. The tribe operates its own fish hatchery.

For further information, visit http://www.fishcherokee.com or call 828-359-6110, or contact Michael LaVoie, EBCI Fisheries and Wildlife Management, at 828-359-6113.

###

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


“Music on the River” series coming to Cherokee

CHEROKEE, N.C. - The ever-popular open-air summer concert series “Music on the River” begins May 27 and runs through Sept. 3.  Concerts take place from 7–9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and occasionally on Sundays, in the riverside area of downtown Cherokee. Admission is free.

Musical performances include rock ’n’ roll, blues, jazz, gospel and country, and take place near local eateries, shopping and downtown water features. The stage is located at the Cherokee Welcome Center, 498 Tsali Blvd.

This year’s lineup includes:

May 27, 2016 – A36 Band

May 28, 2016 – Will Hayes Band

June 3, 2016 – Running Wolfe & the Renegades

June 4, 2016 – AM Superstars

June 10,  2016 – A36 Band

June 11, 2016 – Eastern Blues Band

June 17, 2016 – Eastern Blues Band

June 18, 2016 – John Emil Montagnino

June 24, 2016 – Running Wolfe & the Renegades

June 25, 2016 – Will Hayes Band

July 1, 2016 – Reba Elders

July 2, 2016 – Will Hayes Band

July 8, 2016 – Eastern Blues Band

July 9, 2016 – AM Superstars

July 15, 2016 – John Emil Montagnino

July 16, 2016 – A36 Band

July 22, 2016 – John Emil Montagnino

July 23, 2016 – AM Superstars

July 29, 2016 – John Emil Montagnino

July 30, 2016 – A36 Band

August 5, 2016 – Running Wolfe & the Renegades

August 6, 2016 – AM Superstars

August 12, 2016 – Running Wolfe & the Renegades

August 13, 2016 – AM Superstars

August 19, 2016 – A36 Band

August 20, 2016 – Will Hayes Band

August 26, 2016 – Running Wolfe & the Renegades

August 27, 2016 – Eastern Blues Band

September 2, 2016 – Reba Elders

September 3, 2016 – Will Hayes Band

For additional information: 1-800-438-1601 or 828-359-6490; email: travel@nc-cherokee.com; or contact Frieda Husky, friehusk@nc-cherokee.com, 828-359-6492; or Angela Hernandez, angehern@nc-cherokee.com, 828-359-6473.

###

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Cherokee market offers traditional Native American arts and crafts

CHEROKEE, N.C. – The Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, Inc. Open Air Indian Art Market, held on Saturday, Aug. 27, promises to be one of the best ever with countless authentic handmade Cherokee items. The annual event, open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., features the work of native artisans who are members of Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, Inc.

The outdoor event will take place at the Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, Inc. Co-op in Cherokee.

Admission is free.

There will be live demonstrations storytelling, and music provided by the Sound of Music. A traditional Cherokee meal will be available for $10 from the North American Indian Women’s Association.

For additional information, contact: Vicki Cruz at vicki@quallaartsandcrafts.org or 828-497-3103.

###

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Big prizes await Cherokee anglers

CHEROKEE, N.C. – The year’s biggest cash prizes are on tap for anglers in this year’s Qualla Country Trout Tournament, Sept. 2–4 in Cherokee. The tournament offers $20,000 in prizes. All ages and fishing methods are welcome.

The tournament takes place in Cherokee Enterprise Waters (excluding catch-and-release waters) and runs from 6 a.m. Friday until 5 p.m. Sunday. Tagged fish are worth up to $5,000.

Entry fee is $11 everywhere Cherokee fishing permits are sold. To obtain a permit, required to fish in Cherokee streams or ponds, the cost is $10 for each person 12 years and older. Permits are available at a variety of businesses in Cherokee or can be purchased online. A list of locations is available at FishCherokee.com.

For information, contact the Cherokee Welcome Center at 498 Tsali Boulevard, Cherokee 28719, or call 800-43438-1601. Email: travel@nc-cherokee.com. See more at: http://visitcherokeenc.com/events/detail/the-qualla-country-trout-tournament. Additional contact information: Michael LaVoie at 828-359-6113.

###

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Cherokee rodeo brings thrills, spills

CHEROKEE, N.C. The 4th Annual Seven Clans Rodeo comes to Cherokee Sept. 2–3, serving up a generous portion of bronco busting, bucking bulls, saddle bronco, barrel racing and all sorts of skilled competition by top-named riders.

The Southern Rodeo Association-sanctioned event begins both days at 8 p.m. Gates open at 6 p.m. Location: adjacent to Oconaluftee Islands Park in Cherokee.

General admission, Friday through Saturday Night: adults, $12 in advance/$15 at the gate. Children (12 and under), $6 in advance/$8 at the gate. Tickets can be purchased at Alan’s Jewelry & Pawn, Asheville and Cherokee locations, and the Cherokee Chamber of Commerce. Ticket sales are cash only.

For additional information call: Frieda Huskey; 828-359-6492

###

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Asheville Tourists welcome Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

CHEROKEE, N.C. – Leaders of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and other tribal representatives will be on hand for Cherokee Day as the Asheville Tourists square off versus the Columbia Fireflies Friday, June 17 at 7:05 p.m.

Gates open at 6 p.m. Advance tickets are available for $7 at the Cherokee Chamber of Commerce at 516 Tsali Blvd., Cherokee, or at McCormick Field in Asheville on game day for $9.

For more information, contact Bob Jones: 828-944-0054

###

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Cherokee rodeo brings thrills, spills

CHEROKEE, N.C. – The Third Annual Seven Clans Rodeo comes to Cherokee Sept. 4–5, serving up a generous portion of bronco busting, bucking bulls, saddle bronco, barrel racing and all sorts of skilled competition by top-named riders.

The Southern Rodeo Association-sanctioned event begins both days at 8 p.m. Gates open at 6 p.m. Location: adjacent to Oconaluftee Islands Park in Cherokee.

General admission, Friday through Saturday Night: adults, $12.00 in advance/$15.00 at the gate. Children (12 and under), $6.00 in advance/$8.00 at the gate. Tickets can be purchased at Alan’s Jewelry & Pawn, Asheville and Cherokee locations, and the Cherokee Chamber of Commerce. Ticket sales are cash only.

For additional information call: 828-254-8581.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

###


Big prizes await Cherokee anglers

CHEROKEE, N.C. – The year’s biggest cash prizes are on tap for anglers in this year’s Qualla Country Trout Tournament, Sept. 4-6 in Cherokee. The tournament offers $20,000 in prizes. All ages and fishing methods are welcome.

The tournament takes place in Cherokee Enterprise Waters (excluding catch-and-release waters) and runs from 6 a.m. Friday until 5 p.m. Sunday. Tagged fish are worth up to $5,000.

Entry fee is $11 everywhere Cherokee fishing permits are sold. To obtain a permit, required to fish in Cherokee streams or ponds, the cost is $10 for each person 12 years and older. Permits are available at a variety of businesses in Cherokee or can be purchased online.  A list of locations is available at FishCherokee.com.

For information, contact the Cherokee Welcome Center at 498 Tsali Boulevard, Cherokee, 28719, or call 828-438-1601. Email: travel@nc-cherokee.com. See more at: http://visitcherokeenc.com/events/detail/the-qualla-country-trout-tournament. Additional contact information: Michael LaVoie at 828-554-6113.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

###


Cherokee market offers traditional Native American arts and crafts

CHEROKEE, N.C. – The Qualla Arts and Crafts Open Air Indian Art Market, held on Saturday, Aug. 29, promises to be one of the best ever with countless authentic handmade Cherokee items. The annual event, open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., features the work of native artisans who are members of Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, Inc.

The outdoor event will take place at Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, Inc., located at 645 Tsali Blvd. in Cherokee. Admission is free.

There will be live demonstrations, storytelling, and music provided by the Sound of Music. A traditional Cherokee meal will be for available for $10 from the North American Indian Women’s Association (NAIWA).

For additional information, contact: Vicki Cruz at vicki@quallaartsandcrafts.org or 828-497-3103.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

 

###


Annual children’s fishing tournament on tap for Cherokee

CHEROKEE, N.C. – The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is hosting the 14th Annual Talking Trees Children’s Trout Derby, July 31 – August 1. Children 3-11 years old are invited to compete for $20,000 in prizes. Admission is free.

In 2014, the Derby attracted more than 2,000 youngsters from across the nation.

Pre-registration will be July 31 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Cherokee Indian Fair Grounds. There will be live music, celebrity guests, free food to registered children, clowns, games, zip lines and live animal exhibitions.

Fishing begins Saturday, August 1, at 7 a.m. and ends at 2 p.m. The event takes place at Oconaluftee Islands Park at 86 Tsali Boulevard in Cherokee. Awards and prize presentations follow. Activities are accessible to children with disabilities.

For more information, contact the Cherokee Welcome Center, 498 Tsali Blvd., Cherokee, N.C. 28719, call 1-800-438-6492, or email travel@nc-cherokee.com.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

 

###


Cherokee’s Dog Days Trout Tournament offers $10,000 in prizes

CHEROKEE, N.C. – This year’s Dog Days Trout Tournament, July 17-18, promises to be bigger and better. The popular tagged fishing tournament on the beautiful Oconaluftee River will serve up not just a good time, but $10,000 in prize money, too.

The tournament is open to anglers 12 years and older. Fishing is from 6 a.m.-5 p.m. both days. All that’s needed is a $10 permit to fish in Cherokee waters and payment of an $11 entry fee.

Permits are available at the Cherokee Welcome Center, 498 Tsali Boulevard, at various business locations in Cherokee or online at http://www.FishCherokee.com. Participants can register anywhere fishing permits are sold.

For additional information: contact Mike LaVoie at 828-554-6113 or email michlavo@nc-cherokee.com.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Cherokee’s 40th Annual Powwow caps July 4th weekend

CHEROKEE, N.C. – The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ 40th Annual Powwow kicks off July 3 and runs through July 5 at the Cherokee Acquoni Expo Center.

The Powwow is a yearly three-day explosion of authentic Indian dancing, drumming and tribal regalia. The event features dance competitions offering more than $60,000 in cash prizes, plus hand drumming, tribal sports, tiny tots, fireworks, and special contests all weekend long.

Gates open Friday, July 3, at 5 p.m.; Saturday, July 4, and Sunday, July 5 at 12 p.m. Daily admission is $12, or $10 a day with a Food Lion Card (MVP). Tickets can be purchased at the gate.

For information, contact: Frieda Huskey, Friehusk@nc-cherokee.com or 828.359.6492; Angela Hernandez, angehern@nc-cherokee.com or 828.359.6479; or Daniel Tramper, dtramper@gmail.com or 828.399.0835.

Visitors can also contact the Cherokee Welcome Center: 800.438.1601 or by email at travel@nc-cherokee.com.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Cherokee Day at Asheville Tourists game

Asheville Tourists welcome Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

CHEROKEE, N.C. – Leaders of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) and other tribal representatives will be on hand for Cherokee Day as the Asheville Tourists square off versus the Charleston RiverDogs Sunday, June 14, 2015, at 2:05 p.m.

Gates open at 1:00 p.m. Advance tickets are available for $7.00 at the Cherokee Chamber of Commerce at 516 Tsali Blvd., Cherokee, or at McCormick Field on game day for $9.00.

EBCI Principal Chief Michele Hicks will throw out the first pitch and tribal members will be on hand to answer questions.

For more information contact Bob Jones: 828-944-0054

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west   of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park

 

###


Acclaimed outdoor drama season begins in Cherokee on May 30

CHEROKEE, N.C. - “Unto These Hills,” one of the country’s most popular outdoor dramas, kicks off its 2015 summer season on May 30 and runs through Aug. 15.

The third oldest outdoor drama in the United States, “Unto These Hills” unfolds Mon.-Sat. evenings at 8 p.m. in the newly renovated 2,100-seat Mountainside Theatre at 688 Drama Rd. in Cherokee. Parking is free for ticketholders.

The play, which tells the gripping story of the Cherokee people, traces the tribe’s history from the height of its power, through the heartbreak of the Trail of Tears, into the modern day. Thousands of years in the making, "Unto These Hills" depicts ritual, betrayal, love, action, suspense and loss. Talented actors in spectacular regalia dance, sing and exhilarate amid elaborate sets complete with fog and fire, haunting music and thundering surround-sound effects.

Tickets may be purchased online by visiting http://visitcherokeenc.com or by phoning toll free 866-554-4557. Tickets are also available at the Cherokee Historical Association Box Office at 564 Tsali Blvd., from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., and at the Mountainside Theatre (during summer season; located at 688 Drama Road) from 4 p.m. until showtime.

Paid reservations are held for late arrival. All tickets are held at the box office (cash, Visa, and MasterCard are accepted). Personal checks are not accepted at any of our box office locations.

“Unto These Hills” general admission ticket prices:

Adults: $20
Children 6-12: $10
Children 5 and under: Free

Family Pack (available Monday-Wednesday): Buy one adult ticket, get one child ticket free (general admission tickets only).

“Unto These Hills” reserved ticket prices: 
Adults: $23.00
Children 6-12: $13
Children 5 and under: Free

Discounts are available for groups of 15 or more. Custom itineraries that include other cultural attractions and/or events are available. Groups are encouraged to make advance reservations and must pay in full at least two weeks prior to date of arrival. Cancellations must be made two weeks in advance to receive a refund.
 
For any questions on group information please call 828-497-2111 ext. 215 or 866-554-4557 or contact us via email to michael@cherokee-nc.com.

Rain Insurance is available by contacting the box office up to one day prior to the show for $3 per ticket.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


“Music on the River” series coming to Cherokee

This year’s lineup includes:

May 22 - A36 Band.
May 23, 24 - Amazing Grace Ministries.
May 29 - AM SuperStars.
May 30 - John Emil Montagnino.
June 5 - David Lambert.
June 6 - A36 Band.
June 12 - David Lambert.
June 13 - Eastern Blue Band.
June 19 - A36 Band.
June 20 - AM SuperStars.
June 26 - A36 Band.
June 27 - David Lambert.
July 3, 4, 5 - Amazing Grace Ministries.
July 10 - Eastern Blue Band.
July 11 - A36 Band.
July 17 - AM SuperStars.
July 18 - An Evening with Elvis.
July 24 - John Emil Montagnino.
July 25 - AM SuperStars.
July 31 - A36 Band.
August 1 - Eastern Blue Band.
August 7 - David Lambert.
August 8 - AM SuperStars.
August 14,15 - Eastern Blue Band.
August 21 - Alfred H. Lossiah.
August 22 - AM SuperStars.
August 28 - David Lambert.
August 29 - A36 Band.
September 4 - David Lambert.
September 5 - 12-6 p.m. - Amazing Grace Ministries; 7-9 p.m. - An Evening with Elvis.
September 6 - Amazing Grace Ministries.

For additional information: 1.800.438.1601 or 828.359.6490; email: travel@nc-cherokee.com; or contact Frieda Husky, friehusk@nc-cherokee.com, 828.359.6492; or Angela Hernandez, angehern@nc-cherokee.com, 828.359.6473.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Summer kicks off with major Cherokee trout tourney

CHEROKEE, N.C. - This year, Cherokee’s Memorial Day Trout Tournament will take place May 22-24, offering a weekend of outdoor fun and $10,000 in prizes for tagged fish caught in tribal waters. The tournament is open to all ages and all legal fishing methods. The entry fee is $11.

Participants can register at the Cherokee Welcome Center, 498 Tsali Blvd., or anywhere fishing licenses are sold. Anglers can win cash prizes ranging from $20 to $500 based on the color of the tag.

The Qualla Boundary boasts 30 miles of freestone streams, and only 2.2 miles of catch-and-release waters are excluded from the Memorial Day event.

Prize redemption for tagged fish will be at the Water Beetle Stage next to the Cherokee Welcome Center. Register to redeem cash prizes anywhere fishing licenses are sold.

Nearly 250,000 rainbow, brown and brook trout are released annually into Cherokee waters, which are stocked twice each week and include many trophy sizes. The river system comprises the longest privately owned and stocked waters east of the Mississippi. The tribe operates its own fish hatchery.

For further information, visit http://www. fishcherokee.com or call 828-554-6110, or contact Michael LaVoie, EBCI Fisheries and Wildlife Management, at 828-554-6113.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Cherokee fishing tournament offers $20,000 in prizes

CHEROKEE, N.C. - Anglers will be flocking to Cherokee this weekend to compete for $20,000 in cash prizes, to be awarded during the annual “Cast Into Spring” fishing tournament, taking place March 27-29. The event is co-sponsored by the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Cherokee Chamber of Commerce.

Participants can win prizes ranging from $25 to $5,000 when they land specially tagged fish in the rivers on the Qualla Boundary (excluding the 2.2 miles of catch-and-release waters). The tournament requires an $11 entry fee and a tribal fishing permit. It is open to all ages and all legal fishing methods. Register to redeem cash prizes anywhere fishing licenses are sold.

Prizes can be redeemed at the Cherokee Chamber of Commerce on U.S. 441 (4-6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 12-2 p.m. Sunday).

More than 250,000 rainbow, brown and brook trout are released annually into 30 miles of freestone streams and three ponds on the Qualla Boundary. Local waters are stocked twice each week and include many trophy sizes. The river system comprises the longest privately owned and stocked waters east of the Mississippi. 

For information contact: Michael LaVoie, EBCI Fisheries and Wildlife Management, michlavo@nc-cherokee.com, 828-554-6113.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Cherokee storytellers to rekindle ancient tales

CHEROKEE, N.C. - From May 22 through Sept. 5, visitors to Cherokee can again spend evenings around a roaring bonfire with tribal storytellers who spin tales of days gone by. The bonfires are held 7-9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and every evening from June 29 through July 4. Admission is free and marshmallows for roasting are provided.

Clad in 17th-century period dress, storytellers recount myths and mysteries passed down through the ages as well as tell the history of the Cherokee people. Guests learn Cherokee survival skills and experience traditional native dance. The events are held at Oconaluftee Islands Park, adjacent to the Island Indian Art Market (across road from the KFC on the corner of Tsali Boulevard and U.S. 441).                                    

For information: 1-800-438-1601 or travel@nc-cherokee.com, or contact Frieda Huskey at 828.359.6492 or friehusk@nc-cherokee.com.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a sovereign nation with more than 15,000 enrolled members and is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians makes its home on the 56,600-acre Qualla Boundary in five Western North Carolina counties about an hour west of Asheville and at the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Jerry Wolfe Named Beloved Man

Cherokee, NC -- EBCI tribal elder Jerry Wolfe serves the people of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians every day of his life. A fluent speaker and traditionalist, he is always willing to share his knowledge of the Cherokee culture. 

Due to his self-sacrifice and willingness to serve, Wolfe has been given the title of Beloved Man of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, a designation that hasn’t been made to a man since the early 1800s.

“It’s an honor,” said Wolfe. “It’s a great honor.”

Tribal Council approved Wolfe unanimously as a Beloved Man during its regular session on Thursday, April 11.

“I think our old ways are so important,” said Big Cove Rep. Bo Taylor who originally submitted the resolution (the resolution was amended to state it was submitted by Tribal Council as a whole to show their unanimous support). “We talk about some really important issues. We talk about gaming. We talk about buying other land, but one thing that we need to remember is that the reason we sit here is because we are Indian people. We haven’t had this in a long time. It’s been many, many years since we’ve honored our elders in this way.” 

Rep. Taylor said he has known Wolfe all of his adult life. “He has been nothing but a good person and served this community. I know it’s never been done before in the modern era, but I hope that we would take the time to remember who we are, as Indian people, and this is what we do.”

“I can’t think of anyone that deserves this honor more than Jerry Wolfe.”

Prior to the passage of the resolution on Thursday, Russell Townsend, EBCI Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, gave a brief history of the title of Beloved Man throughout history. 

“In 1785 (Treaty of Hopewell), Benjamin Hawkins recorded for Andrew Pickins that the Cherokee showed up in great numbers with their women and children, and they allowed their Beloved Men and Women to speak,” he commented. “Among those Beloved Men and Women who spoke were Corntassel, or Longtassel, and Nancy Ward, Beloved Woman. So, we know in 1785 that the term was used, and it was used throughout the 1700s.” 

Townsend went on to say, “These were people who were more important than Chiefs and more important than headmen of a particular community. They were respected throughout the Cherokee world.” 

Barbara Duncan, Museum of the Cherokee Indian education director, also spoke of the history of the Beloved Man. “Throughout the 1700s, whether the Cherokees were at treaty negotiations or at the colonial capitals of Charleston and Williamsburg, they talk about the Beloved Men and the Beloved Women. They were, as Timberlake says, ‘warriors who were too old for them to go to war anymore, but who were valued by the Tribe for their service to the Tribe’.” 

Duncan said that in addition to living a life of service, they were also respected for their integrity and good character. She said the last recorded instance she could find of a Beloved Man was Little Turkey who died in 1801. 

Yellowhill Rep. B. Ensley spoke highly of Wolfe, “There’s not a better respected man in Cherokee.”

Myrtle Driver is a Beloved Woman of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and serves as a Cherokee language translator for the Tribal Council and the Kituwah Academy. “Oftentimes, we may come across a word that we don’t remember or we need to know something about our history or our culture, and we can always go to Jerry, and he is always more than willing to help us. And, I really do appreciate all that Jerry Wolfe has given us.”

Painttown Rep. Tommye Saunooke commented to Wolfe, “Now, you join the ranks of Nancy Ward, Maggie Wachacha, Lula Gloyne, Louise Maney and Myrtle Driver.”

In addition to his service to the Tribe, Wolfe was a World War II veteran having served in the U.S. Navy. He has been honored by many organizations and received many honors over the years for his cultural knowledge. In 2003, he received the North Carolina Folk Heritage Award and in 2010, he received the Brown-Hudson Folklore Award from the North Carolina Folklore Society.


Media Contact Info

Suzanne Metcalf
suzanne@suzannemetcalf.com
828.817.2089

Sharri Pheasant
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians
sharphea@nc-cherokee.com
545 Tsali Blvd.
Cherokee, NC 28719
office:  828.359.6711

Plan
Trip
+
Sample Trips